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EMOM Homework

Follow whichever program fits you best. The first is for people who have 8 or more strict pull-ups in a row. The second is for people who have between 4-7 strict pull-ups in a row. The third is for people who have less that 3 or less strict pull-ups in a row. There is a brief description of each of the movements at the bottom. It is set up for MWF, but if you need to do different days, that is fine. Just choose three non-consecutive days. Record your results! Good luck and have fun!

 

If you have 8 or more strict pull-ups in a row, here is your homework

Monday

Set 1: Unweighted working set – max rep strict pull-ups (minus 2)

Set 2: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 8 weighted reps

Set 3: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 8 weighted reps

Set 4: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 8 weighted reps

Set 5: Unweighted cool-down set – max rep strict pull-ups

*Try to increase weight each set

 

Wednesday

Set 1: Unweighted working set – max rep strict pull-ups (minus 2)

Set 2: Weighted working set – add 5 pounds from heaviest set from day 1 for max reps

Set 3: Weighted working set – add another 5 pounds for max reps

Set 4: Weighted working set – add another 5 pounds for max reps

Set 5: Unweighted cool-down set – max rep strict pull-ups (at least 1 more than day 1)

 

Friday

Set 1: Unweighted working set – max rep strict pull-ups (minus 2)

Set 2: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 8 weighted reps

Set 3: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 6 weighted reps

Set 4: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 4 weighted reps

Set 5: Unweighted cool-down set – max rep strict pull-ups (at least 1 more than day 2)

Rest exactly 90 seconds between sets

Re-test your max rep strict pull-ups the following week

 

 

If you have at 4-7 strict pull-ups in a row, here is your homework

Monday

4xME strict pull ups (complete one set of max effort, then drop off the bar, shake out your hands, rest for 30 seconds, and then complete 2 more unbroken reps – that is 1 set, you will do 4 of these)

 

Wednesday

Find your 1RM strict pull-up

 

Friday

Set 1: Unweighted working set – max rep strict pull-ups (minus 2)

Set 2: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 6 weighted reps

Set 3: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 4 weighted reps

Set 4: Weighted working set – pick a weight that you can complete 2 weighted reps

Set 5: Unweighted cool-down set – max rep strict pull-ups

Rest exactly 90 seconds between sets

Re-test your max rep strict pull-ups the following week

 

 

If you have 3 or less strict pull-ups in a row, here is your homework

Monday

Flexed Arm Hang 4×10 seconds

Negative Pull-ups 4×2 (hold chin above the bar for 2 seconds, then lower to full extension for a 6 second count)

Partner Assisted Pull-ups 4×4

 

Wednesday

Flexed Arm Hang 4×20 seconds

Negative Pull-ups 4×3 (hold chin above the bar for 2 seconds, then lower to full extension for a 6 second count)

Partner Assisted Pull-ups 4×6

 

Friday

Flexed Arm Hang 4×30 seconds

Negative Pull-ups 4×4 (hold chin above the bar for 2 seconds, then lower to full extension for a 6 second count)

Partner Assisted Pull-ups 4×8

Rest exactly 60 seconds between sets

Re-test your max rep strict pull-ups the following week

 

 

The Exercises

  1. Pull-up: Using a pronated grip, start with the arms extended and pull yourself up so your chin is above the bar.
  2. Compared to the chin-up, pull-ups place more emphasis on the rear delts, mid back, brachialis, and brachioradialis. It’s generally considered harder than a chin-up.
  3. Chin-up: Using a supinated grip, start with the arms extended and pull yourself up so your chin is above the bar.
  4. Compared to the pull-up, chin-ups place more emphasis on the lats and the biceps. It’s generally considered easier than the pull-up.
  5. Flexed-Arm Hang: Get your chin above the bar and hold that position for a set time. The grip is normally supinated but can be pronated.
  6. Negatives: Get your chin above the bar and then lower yourself back down until your arms are straight, attempting to keep control of your body at all times. Generally, negatives are 6-10 seconds in length.
  7. Partner Assisted Pull-ups: Cross your legs and have your partner hold your feet pressed up against his upper thigh. He’s not lifting you, he’s keeping his hands stable. You press against him (perform a leg extension) to push yourself up; thus you can regulate how much help you need. The more tired you are, the more you push.

Plate Sizes Tell us How Much to Eat

Below is an excerpt from Breaking Muscle on how visual cues affect our eating.

Many of us have heard that the size of our plate can affect how much we eat. Brian Wansink and his colleagues have done a tremendous amount of research on how visual cues affect consumption. For example, he has found that eating popcorn from a bigger tub, eating soup from a refilling bowl, and eating chicken wings where the bones disappear below the table all lead to more consumption.2,4,5 His general hypothesis is that much of the obesity in our society is caused by habits, with one very big habit being that we rely on visual cues to tell us how much to eat.1

 Our Eyes Are Bigger Than Our Metabolisms

plate size, portion size, craig marker, overeating, science behind plate size

A recent study by Wansink and colleagues set out to see how visual cues (i.e., plate size) affect consumption.6 This study was actually made up of four separate studies that build upon each other. Study number one investigated how much people think is right to serve themselves. Cereal bowls were set out with differing amounts of cereal. Participants were asked two questions: how much is the appropriate serving and how much would you serve yourself. Interestingly, the responses for the two questions differed. Participants thought the most appropriate serving was when the bowl is about 66% full. However, they indicated that they would often serve themselves a bowl that was 75% full. Thus, it seems like there is already a conscious bias that people serve themselves more than what they think is an established norm. To say it another way, we fill our plates more than we know we should.

 Plate Size Matters

 Study number two investigated how much people serve themselves at a Chinese buffet-style restaurant if they use small or large plates. Participants in the study did not know they were being observed and could choose either a small or large plate to serve themselves. People who chose a large plate tended to put about 52% more food on their plate and ate about 45% more. One potential issue is that maybe these dinners chose the larger plate because they were hungrier and therefore they ate more. However, the results are consistent with other studies that show people tend to eat more when given a large plate. From a business standpoint, I can see why buffets tend to use small plates as it certainly cuts the cost of food preparation (or maybe they are thinking of the health of the consumers). The take-home point from this study is that we might want to purchase smaller plates for our homes.

 Behavior Habits Are Hard to Break

 The third study is quite intriguing as it involved human resource managers who were taking part in a three-day seminar on creating healthy organizations. The participants had just attended an hour-long lecture on how plate size can affect eating patterns. The point of the lecture was to pay attention to the amount of food on the plate and not on the proportion of the plate that is filled. After the seminar, participants were brought to lunch and randomly assigned to one of two buffet lines. The only difference in the lines was the plate size. As I was reading the study, I had that same feeling that I do when watching a horror film. “Don’t go in there.” “Don’t fall for it.” Even after just attending the lecture on food consumption and plate size, the larger the plate the more food that was consumed. That is, people still ate 50% more food even after hearing about how plate size affects food consumption. The habit of using a visual cue for eating seems like a tough one to break.

How to Apply This Knowledge

There has been an ongoing philosophical discussion of whether the mind can override the instinctual aspects of our self. The argument has swayed back and forth between saying we are rational creatures and we are creatures of our emotions. From an evolutionary perspective, our instincts have had many more years to be refined and finely honed (an analogy would be the tenth version of software). The rational conscious system is relatively new (continuing the analogy, it is beta software). When it comes to eating it seems like we rely a lot more on habit than on our rational thinking side.

September 15 Deadline

There are two important deadlines on September 15.

First, if you are going to be part of the one month healthy eating challenge with Natalie. You must sign up and have all measurements complete by September 15.

Second, the Tactical Strength Challange will take place on October 4 at CrossFit Empirical. Anyone can come and do the workout. However, if you want to sign up officially (to see your score and to get a t-shirt), you must do so by September 15 at http://www.strongfirst.com/tactical-strength-challenge/ (sign up with Florida Kettlebell / CrossFit Empirical as your location. 1452341_546744858742082_1901254866_nAgain, the workout consists of:

  • A max powerlifting deadlift (three attempts)
  • Pull ups for max reps (palms forward, no kipping, neck must touch the bar) or a flexed arm hang (in the Novice Women’s category)
  • Kettlebell snatches for max reps in a 5:00 time period (unlimited hand switches and different weights for different competitor categories)

Saturday Strength September 14 Sunday Edition

NOTE: This week Saturday Strength will become Sunday Strength to accommodate the 5k race on Saturday. (still at 8:30AM)

We are excited to get back to Saturday Strength this weekend. This week we will focus on how compensatory acceleration training can help you build strength. We will do some training with bands to demonstrate.

We will also talk about positioning in the squat. If you look at the picture below, you can see how the front squat, high bar, and low bar place different emphasis on particular muscles.

squat

As you already know, muscles can only pull. Thus, in the high bar and front squat there is more emphasis on the thigh muscles that pull at the knee and at the hip to straighten out the body (much more thigh dominant). In the low bar position, the glutes and hamstrings need to pull a lot more to straighten the back (much more posterior chain dominant). If you are training to be a better Olympic lifter, then front squats and high bar squats are probably more important. Powerlifters tend to use the low bar squat position more as they can recruit more of the posterior chain.

We could also analyze the deadlift in the same manner. If we want to be better at Olympic lifting, we might do our deadlifts more like our pull from the ground when we clean. In an Olympic clean our shoulders are more over the bar (and our weight is more in our toes). We will be aiming for more vertical lift, similar to a vertical jump (more thighs).

Clean-Progression2

A powerlifting deadlift tends to have the shoulders behind the bar more and more weight in the heels. The position relies on the hamstrings and glutes to grind out the end of the lift. The end of the powerlifting deadlift is very similar to the kettlebell swing hip hinge (hence the reason to focus on Russian swings as they can have an amazing effect on deadlift strength; Kettlebell swings provide a lot of explosive power to the end of movements like the deadlift.).

hip-hinge

EMOM class

EMOM, or every minute on the minute, is a way to accumulate the volume and practice

necessary to develop skills while simultaneously working on capacity in some of the high-skill

movements. The way this type of workout formula works is as follows:

  • One or two movements are picked to do either on the minute or alternating on the minute over the course of 5 to 30 minutes.
  • Reps of two to five are done at a high percentage of the athlete’s 1RM for Olympic lifting or Powerlifting movements, with the rep scheme of gymnastics movements ranging from five up to twenty, depending on the time constraints and level of skill.
  • Rest periods are kept to a minimum while the central nervous system is not overly taxed. What this formula enables the athlete to do is accumulate volume and solid, consistent mechanics with loads or movements that require high levels of coordination. Putting exercises or groups of exercises into EMOM workouts has several advantages. Firstly, it allows us to work on the more complicated CrossFit movements under duress, yet still maintain proper form. If you’re relatively new to power cleans, it’s not a good idea to do a lot of them within a bunch of other movements. Although you may still be lifting the weight, you’re probably not really doing power cleans, but rather back-heaving reverse-curls. Using EMOM workouts, we can still include the power clean for conditioning, but within a controlled environment that allows proper execution.

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Here is an example:

20 minute EMOM alternating on the minute:

  • 2 bear complex @ 80% of 1RM 3-position clean and push press on the even minutes
  • 10 lateral burpees over bar on the odd minutes

If we examine this workout, we see an athlete executing 20 bear complexes (which equates to

20 power cleans, 20 front squats, 20 push press, 20 back squats, and 20 behind the neck push

press…100 total lifts) at a relatively high percentage of their 1RM with 100 burpees in under 20

minutes. This is a fantastic amount of work that should allow for enough recovery of the CNS to

maintain solid mechanics with limited rest throughout the 20 minutes. This is very time-efficient

way to develop skill and capacity.

 

Each movement should ideally and realistically be completed within the first 20-30 second

time interval, with 40 seconds being the upper end for the work component. This allows for an

average of 30-40 seconds rest time, with a 1:1 work to rest ratio, with 20 seconds being the limit

on the least amount of time for the rest component.

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Many people don’t like to experience failure, and look to do workouts that only accentuate

their strengths, rather than point out their weaknesses. Whether you think you do it or not, most

people cherry-pick their workouts, and don’t spend the necessary time working on the skills that

limit them. If a coach puts up 4×400 meter run time trials as the WOD, most people who hate to

run will likely skip this or take it as a rest day. If a coach puts up 1RM barbell lift and no metcon,

many endurance athletes may skip this day, feeling as though it is not taxing enough on their

bodies. I strongly believe in the notion of “If you want to succeed, learn to fail.” What I mean by

this is, test your limits. Go to failure so you are aware of your capabilities and your limitations.

This will only make you stronger in the end. Your strengths will only get stronger, and your

weaknesses will evolve into strengths if you put in the time and effort.

 

I have an old school CrossFit mentality. I began CrossFit in 2008 and have been coaching since

2009. I like the old “Hopper” style of workouts. You don’t know what the workout is going to

be until right before you do it. No cherry-picking, no gaming, no practicing…JUST 3-2-1 GO!

Anyone can practice a workout enough times and get better at it, but does this really test your

true skill and ability level? Are we really programming for the unknown and the unknowable?

Each week that you come to an EMOM class, you will be challenged. The first 10 minutes

consist of a specific lift for max effort for that day. This will be followed up by a 20 minute

EMOM with a form of the lift we completed earlier at a certain percentage of whatever weight

you personally achieved for that day. There are some days people come into the gym and feel

great, and other days, our bodies are fighting with us, and we can’t lift as much as a normally

would. This is why I feel it is best to program the lifting percentage portion of the workout

based on your body’s ability on that specific day. A certain number of reps of this lift will be

performed on the even minutes, and will be coupled with a high skill gymnastics movement

on the odd minutes. It is in this format, I believe, we will be able to work on various aspects of

training:

1. Pacing

2. Heavy barbell Olympic and powerlifting movements for efficiency, technique, and proper

form/mechanics

3. Strength Building

4. Skill Building

5. Metabolic Conditioning

6. Testing your limits!

At the end of the 20 minute EMOM, we will have a finisher. In the past, these have consisted

of 50 HSPU for time, 250 double unders for time, 50 T2B/K2E complex, etc. There will be a 5

minute time-cap on these finishers. The point of the finisher is to push yourself to complete a

task after taxing your body so intensely. We will revisit each of these finishers on a regular basis

in order to test your imrpvement on these skills.